Casella di testo: Capodimonte ……

……. At The Astronomical Observatory, studies on the solar machine, (which is a real laboratory of modern physics, and its surrounding environment) in particular on comets and cosmic dust - are carried out; the properties and the evolutionary processes of the stars are investigated; galaxies are observed to discover both their visible and obscure components, their interactions and aggregation, to measure their distance and to throw light upon how the universe evolved throughout the last 15 billion years ……… more ……..


……. Magnificent Capodimonte Royal Palace, built in the time of Charles III and set in a park, houses The Museum and The Gallery,  that give an overview of Italian and European art, including works by Titian, Botticelli, Perugino, Raphael and Caravaggio.
On the first floor is the Royal Apartment dating back to the Bourbons which are filled with valuable collections such as the famous porcelains. On the second and third floors is a gallery dedicated to the art of Naples and sections which treat eighteenth century and contemporary art …... more ….




……. The Capodimonte Porcelain Manufacture finds its origin in 1738, the year of the marriage of King Charles to Maria Amalia daughter of the King of Saxony, Augustus III of Poland and granddaughter of Augustus II, Elector of Saxony and King of Poland and founder of the first European hard paste porcelain factory in Meissen in 1710. 
Charles desired to create a porcelain equal in quality to that which was produced in the Meissen porcelain factory in Germany.  ….. more…...

Casella di testo: A beautiful work is a joy. For ever !
Casella di testo: Collezioni Gargiulo by Stefania Gargiulo
Via Termine n° 2 - 80061 Massa Lubrense (Naples) - Italy
info@collezionigargiulo.it
Phone +39 081 808 06 13
Partita IVA  05204821218  - C.C.I.A.A. NA 739947
Casella di testo: Capodimonte Gallery
Casella di testo: Versione italiana
Casella di testo: Information :


info@collezionigargiulo.it
Casella di testo: Capodimonte ……

……. all’Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte si continua a studiare la complessa macchina solare e l'ambiente circostante l'astro - in particolar modo le comete e le polveri cosmiche - si investigano le proprietà ed i meccanismi evolutivi delle stelle, si osservano le galassie per conoscerne gli ingredienti, visibili ed oscuri, le interazioni e i modi di aggregazione, per misurarne le distanze, col fine ultimo di sapere in che modo l'universo si sia sviluppato lungo l'arco di 15 miliardi di anni. , ….. continua ….. 



……. Il magnifico Palazzo Reale  di Capodimonte, voluto da Carlo III di Borbone e circondato da un bellissimo parco, ospita Il Museo e La Galleria Nazionale che offrono una panoramica dell’arte Italiana ed Europea, includendo opere di Tiziano, Botticelli, Perugino, Raffaello e Caravaggio. 
Al primo piano è possibile visitare l’Appartamento Reale con le manifatture borboniche, tra cui le celebri porcellane. Al secondo e al terzo livello ci sono la Galleria Napoletana e le sezioni dell’Ottocento e dell’arte contemporanea. ……..continua……. 


……. La Real Fabbrica di Porcellana di Capodimonte nasce nel 1738, l’anno del matrimonio di Carlo di Borbone con Maria Amalia, figlia del Re di Sassonia, Augusto III di Polonia e nipote di Auguro , Elettore di Sassonia, Re di Polonia e fondatore della prima fabbrica di porcellana, a pasta dura, in Europa, a Meissen nel 1710.
Carlo desiderava produrre una porcellana uguale per qualità a quella che era prodotta nella fabbrica di porcellane di Meissen, in Germania. 
. …..continua………...

last update : 22th june 2009

Casella di testo: History of porcelain 

Oriental porcelains. The Chinese probably made the first true porcelain during the Tang dynasty (618-907). The techniques for combining the proper ingredients and firing the mixture at extremely high temperatures gradually developed out of the manufacture of stoneware. During the Song dynasty (960-1279), Chinese emperors started royal factories to produce porcelain for their palaces. Since the 1300's, most Chinese porcelain has been made in the city of Jingdezhen. 
For centuries, the Chinese made the world's finest porcelain. Collectors regard many porcelain bowls and vases produced during the Ming dynasty (1368-1644) and Qing dynasty (1644-1912) as artistic treasures. Porcelain makers perfected a famous blue and white underglazed porcelain during the Ming period. Painting over the glaze with enamel colors also became a common decorating technique at this time. During the Qing period, the Chinese developed a great variety of patterns and colors and exported porcelain objects to Europe in increasing numbers. 
By the 1100's, the secret of making porcelain had spread to Korea and to Japan in the 1500's. Workers in these countries also created beautiful porcelain objects. A Japanese porcelain called Kakiemon was first produced during the 1600's. It features simple designs on a white background. Another well-known Japanese porcelain called Imari ware, or Arita, is famous for its dense decorations in deep blue and red. 
European porcelains. As early as the 1100's, traders brought Chinese porcelain to Europe, where it became greatly admired. However, it was so rare and expensive that only wealthy people could afford it.
As trade with the Orient grew during the 1600's, porcelain became popular with the general public. The custom of drinking tea, coffee, and chocolate became widespread and created a huge demand for porcelain cups and saucers. European manufacturers responded by trying to make hard-paste porcelain themselves, but for a long time they failed to discover the secret. Nevertheless, some of their experiments resulted in beautiful soft-paste porcelain. The first European soft-paste porcelain was produced in Florence, Italy, about 1575. By the 1700's, porcelain manufactured in many parts of Europe was starting to compete with Chinese porcelain. France, Germany, Italy, and England became the major centers for European porcelain production. 
French porcelains. France became famous during the 1700's as the leading producer of soft-paste porcelain. The first factories were established at Rouen, St. Cloud, Lille, and Chantilly. 
The most celebrated type of soft-paste porcelain was first produced at Vincennes in 1738. In 1756, the factory was moved to the town of Sevres. Its soft-paste porcelain became known as Sevres. The earliest Sevres had graceful shapes and soft colors. Sevres pieces produced from 1750 to 1770 were decorated with brilliant colors and heavy gilding. Many of these pieces had richly colored backgrounds and white panels painted with birds, flowers, landscapes, or people. Sevres is also noted for its fine figurines of biscuit (unglazed porcelain). 
Beginning in 1771, a hard-paste porcelain industry developed near Limoges, where kaolin deposits had been discovered. By the 1800's, Limoges had become one of the largest porcelain centers in Europe. An American named David Haviland opened a porcelain factory at Limoges in 1842 to make tableware for the American market. Haviland porcelain features soft colors that blend together and small floral patterns. 
German porcelains. A German chemist named Johann Friedrich Bottger discovered the secret of making hard-paste porcelain in 1708 or 1709. This discovery led to the establishment of a porcelain factory in Meissen in 1710. Meissen porcelain is sometimes called Dresden because Bottger first worked near the city. For nearly a century, it surpassed in quality all other hard-paste porcelain made in Europe. The great success of Meissen porcelain can be partly attributed to the fine artists who decorated it. 
Capodimonte porcelains. The Capodimonte Porcelain Manufacture finds its origin in 1738, the year of the marriage of King Charles to Maria Amalia daughter of the King of Saxony, Augustus III of Poland and granddaughter of Augustus II, Elector of Saxony and King of Poland and founder of the first European hard paste porcelain factory in Meissen in 1710. 
Charles desired to create a porcelain equal in quality to that which was produced in the Meissen porcelain factory in Germany. The first employees of the factory - located on the hill near to the royal palace of Capodimonte - were Livio Vittorio Schepers, Giovanni Caselli, Livio Gaetano’s son, tasked with the preparation of the porcelain dough; the Florentine sculptor Giuseppe Gricci, who had to mould it, the painter Giuseppe Della Torre, the carver Ambrogio Di Giorgio and a few other workers and apprentices. It took much time and effort to produce the correct formula and drying techniques. Many setbacks were suffered while searching for that perfect formula until finally they discovered deposits of Kaolin in Catanzaro and gave very good results so that the Capodimonte porcelains were considered superior to the French ones. 
In 1759, when Philip V of Spain died, Charles then became the King of Spain.He adopted the name of Charles III (1759 -1788). He decided to bring the manufacture and all its workers and artists with him to Madrid, where it stopped its production in 1808. But in Naples the Capodimonte manufacture never stopped its production. 
The Royal Manufacture of King Ferdinand
Charles' son Ferdinand (1751-1825) succeeded his father to the Neapolitan throne becoming Ferdinand IV King of Naples (1759-1816) and later as Ferdinand I King of the Two Sicilies (1816-1825). He attempted to establish a new porcelain 
factory at Portici in 1771, and then in the Royal Palace of Naples. This was the startup of the Royal Manufacture of King Ferdinand, whose porcelains were marked with a letter “N”, blue in colour and topped by a crown. Its production had three artistic periods: a first period, from 1773 to 1780, under the artistic lead of the painter and sculptor Francesco Celebrano; a second period, from 1780 to 1799 (year of the French invasion), the best period, when all Neapolitan arts flourished and the porcelains triumphed; and a last and third period from 1800 to 1806, the year in which Giuseppe Bonaparte came to Naples and the Royal Manufacture definitely stopped its activities. The French had little interest in Neapolitan porcelain production and they sold the factory and its contents to a group of local businessmen led by Giovanni Poulard-Prad.
In the subsequent decades artists among Naples maintained the Capodimonte tradition alive.
Today, the area surrounding Naples maintained the main flower production, it is around Milan that the tradition  sustained mainly the figurine tradition. A trend developed also in Veneto, between the cities of Vicenza and Bassano.
Casella di testo: Storia della porcellana

La nascita della Porcellana. 
I cinesi probabilmente produssero la prima porcellana durante la dinastia Tang (618-907). Le tecniche per la combinazione degli ingredienti e la cottura della miscela ottenuta a temperature molto elevate si sono gradualmente sviluppate fino alla fabbricazione del gres. Durante la dinastia Song (960-1279), gli imperatori cinesi istituirono fabbriche reali per la produzione di porcellane per i loro palazzi. Dal 1300, la maggior parte della porcellana cinese è stata prodotta nella città Jingdezhen. Per secoli, I cinesi hanno fabbricato la migliore ceramica del mondo. Molti collezionisti considerano le porcellane prodotte durante le dinastie Ming (1368-1644) e Qing (1644-1912) veri tesori artistici. 
Dal 1100, la produzione della porcellana si diffuse prima in Corea e, successivamente, in Giappone; artigiani di questi paesi hanno infatti creato bellissimi oggetti di porcellana. Un tipo di porcellana Giapponese, chiamata “Kakiemon” , si caratterizza per semplici disegni su sfondo bianco; un’altro tipo di porcellana, in giapponese “Imari” o “Arita”, è famoso per I suoi decori su blu e rosso. 

La Porcellana in Europa.
Fin dal 1100 la porcellana cinese  - “China” - è stata importata in Europa, deve venne immediatamente apprezzata. Tuttavia, era così rara e costosa che soltanto i più ricchi potevano permettersela.
Con lo sviluppo del commercio con l’Oriente ( 1600 ) la porcellana divenne popolare. In particolare, crebbe la domanda di tazze e piattini di porcellana al crescere del consumo di tè, caffé e cioccolata. Ciò spinse molte fabbriche Europee a produrre oggetti di porcellana “a pasta dura”, ma per molto tempo non si riuscì a scoprire il segreto della sua fabbricazione.
In ogni caso, alcuni tentativi produssero risultati : nel 1575 a Firenze si riuscì a produrre una bellissima porcellana a “pasta tenera”.
Con il tempo le tecniche si affinavano tanto che nel 1700 molte fabbriche europee di porcellana potevano competere con quelle cinesi.
Francia, Germania, Italia ed Inghilterra divennero i più importanti centri europei per la produzione di porcellana. 
La Francia divenne famosa durante il 1700 per essere il principale produttore di porcellana a “pasta tenera”. Le prime fabbriche erano a  Rouen, St. Cloud, Lille, e Chantilly. Il tipo di porcellana a pasta tenera più celebrato è stato prodotto per la prima volta a Vincennes nel 1738. Nel 1756, la produzione  venne trasferita a Sevres, città da cui prese il nome. Le prime Sevres ebbero figure graziose e morbidi colori. La produzione Sevres dal 1750 al 1770 venne decorate con colori brillanti e pesante doratura
Un chimico tedesco, Johann Friedrich Bottger, scoprì il segreto della produzione di porcellana a pasta dura nel 1708 o nel 1709. E’ grazie a questa scoperta che venne avviata la produzione di porcellana a Meissen nel 1710. la porcellana di Meissen è a volte denominate “Dresda” perchè Bottger lavorò vicino a questa città.
Per quasi un secolo, la qualità della porcellana di Meissen sopravanzò tutte le altro porcellane prodotte in Europa. 
A partire dal 1771, una industria di porcellana a pasta dura si sviluppo nei pressi di Limoges, dove erano stati scoperti dei dopositi di caolino; città ancor oggi nota per le sue produzioni.

La Porcellana di Capodimonte. 
La Real Fabbrica di Porcellana di Capodimonte nasce nel 1738, l’anno del matrimonio di Carlo di Borbone con Maria Amalia, figlia del Re di Sassonia, Augusto III di Polonia e nipote di Auguro , Elettore di Sassonia, Re di Polonia e fondatore della prima fabbrica di porcellana, a pasta dura, in Europa, a Meissen nel 1710.
Carlo desiderava produrre una porcellana uguale per qualità a quella che era prodotta nella fabbrica di porcellane di Meissen, in Germania. 
I primi addetti alla fabbrica  - che venne costruita sulla collina di Capodimonte, poco distante dal Palazzo Reale - furono Livio Vittorio Schepers, Giovanni Caselli, il figlio di Livio, Gaetano, incaricati dell'impasto; lo scultore fiorentino Giuseppe Gricci, con l'incarico di modellatore, il pittore Giuseppe Della Torre e l'intagliatore Ambrogio Di Giorgio più altri pochi operai e vari garzoni. Ci volle molto tempo e parecchi tentativi prima di riuscire a mettere a punto la formula corretta dell’impasto, finché venne scoperto un deposito di caolino nei pressi di Catanzaro, nonché le tecniche di produzione. 
Il risultato di tanto lavoro fu talmente positivo che le porcellane di Capodimonte erano considerate superiori a quelle francesi. 
Nel 1759, alla morte di Filippo V di Spagna, Carlo divenne Re di Spagna, adottando il nome di Carlo III (1759 -1788).  Egli ordinò che tutte le attrezzature necessarie per la produzione della porcellana e tutti gli operai ed artisti fossero trasferiti a Madrid, dove la produzione terminò nel 1808.
Al contrario a Napoli la produzione di porcellana non venne mai interrotta. 
La Real Fabbrica di Re Ferdinando 
Il figlio di Carlo, Ferdinando, successe a suo padre sul trono di Napoli con il nome di Ferdinando IV Re di Napoli (1759-1816) e, dopo la parentesi francese, con il nome di Ferdinando I Re delle due Sicilie (1816-1825). 
Nel 1771 egli ordinò di avviare una nuova fabbrica di porcellane nella Reggia di Portici, e successivamente nel Palazzo Reale di Napoli. 
Videro la luce le famose porcellane della Real Fabbrica Ferdinandea, contrassegnate con una lettera "N" azzurra coronata. Vi furono tre periodi artistici di produzione: dal 1773 al 1780 con la direzione artistica affidata al pittore e scultore Francesco Celebrano; poi dal 1780 al 1799 (anno dell’invasione francese), il periodo migliore, che vide la fioritura di tutte le arti napoletane oltre al trionfo della porcellana; infine dal 1800 al 1806, anno dell'arrivo di Giuseppe Bonaparte, quando la Real Fabbrica chiuse definitivamente la sua attività. 
Infatti i francesi non avevano alcun interesse a proseguire nella produzione di porcellane e vendettero tutte le attrezzature ad alcuni imprenditori locali, tra cui Giovanni  Poulard-Prad. 

Nei decenni che seguirono molti artisti napoletani mantennero viva la tradizione della produzione delle porcellane di Capodimonte. 
Oggi Napoli e la sua provincia mantengono il primato nella produzione di fiori in porcellana, mentre é nell’area di Milano ed in Veneto, tra le città di Vicenza e Bassano,  che si fabbricano le più belle miniature in porcellana. 

Casella di testo: Collezioni Gargiulo
La qualità ….. conveniente !

é a Sant’Agata sui due Golfi, Massa Lubrense, a soli 3 Km da Sorrento (NA)

Articoli da regalo - Bomboniere - Cose per la casa
Casella di testo: Il Battesimo
abitini, camicini, bomboniere

Casella di testo: Perché fare la lista di nozze?

Per evitare probabili doppioni e risparmiare, ai Vostri invitati, tempo, imbarazzo e denaro.

www.lamialistadinozze.it
Casella di testo: Casella di testo:
Google
Web www.capodimontegallery.com
Casella di testo: italian fashion
Sant'Agata sui due Golfi - Italy - vista del Golfo di Napoli e di Sorrento dal Deserto